Thursday, 27 February 2014

Idiolect Homework - Due Weds 5th March

What is your idiolect?

A person's idiolect is their own personal language, the words they choose and any other features that characterise their speech and writing.

Write a paragraph on the blog explaining the different things that you think have influenced the way you speak (your idiolect). Give reasons for your answers.

18 comments:

  1. Your language is influenced by your parents and where they come from. You inherit things that they say and pick up on little sayings that run in the family. Your parents teach you how to talk politely. Your accent can change with your surroundings and can change the words you decide to use. You can pick up on things that people say when your around them lots of the time. Your voice can change with different emotions, it can change the way you say things, and the tone you use in which to say it in. - Gemma Moritmer.

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  2. I think that what I say has been heavily influenced by what my parents say, and what everyone I look up to says. They all speak fairly similarly to Queen's english, but they all have their distinct differences. I also have been influenced by what I watch on telly, and the people I am subscribed to on youtube. My friends have changed how I speak, and I have started using two dialects, one to talk to my friends with, and one to talk to everyone else. My girlfriend has also changed how I speak, and so now I dont use as clever terminology, because she does not want to listen to me if I use my normal speach. Also my subjects at school have changed how I speak, as I now speak more technologically and with a lot more logic. Overall, I dont think that my accent have changed, as I've lived in the same place all my life, with only a half hour drive to where I was born.

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  3. Kathryn Langley1 March 2014 at 01:45

    The way your speak is influenced by the people around you. Your family will teach you how to speak "correctly" but being around other people can affect whether you speak "correctly". You may pick up new words or sayings from other people and use them yourself even if others do not use them. Your accent can change with your surroundings and the way you speak can be affected by your emotions and whether you like the people you are speaking to.
    If, for example, the people you are with swear a lot or use slang, you are more likely to swear and use slang when you are with them.

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  4. A person’s idiolect is the variety of language unique to an individual. Your pronunciation depends on where you live or where you have lived. It also usually changes when you are with different people and also the circumstances. Your idiolect is usually appropriate to your various interests and activities. Most people have a change of language and tone depending on the circumstances and who they are addressing. -Lucy Hunter

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  5. I think there are many thing that can influence the way a person talks and their own indiolect. One of the things that influences my language is my parents and my family. My mum is from Manchester so because of her upbringing and the way she spoke when she was younger due to her environment have rubbed of on to me and the way I say and write certain things. Also my dad was raised in London so because of his upbringing and the place he was raised I will sometimes say or write things that are typically not said around here and are more commonly said in London. Another factor the effects my indiolect is my friends and my families friends. If one of my friends has a different personal language and I am around for long amounts of time I begin to pick up on things they say which then become part of my regular language. Similarly if the same thing happen with on of my family members and they begin to use different language I will being to sub-consciously start saying them. Plus where you live yourself and the way people where you live talk will become part of you day to day language. Scientist believe this happens because of the natural neurons in our brains called 'mirror neurons' which cause to mimic the actions of the people around you. - Lucy Collette

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  6. I think my idiolect is basically very bland, because it’s based off the accent that I feel basically everyone in the UK says is indistinguishable as an accent: Oxfordshire. From all the people I talk to, at least. I can’t tell whether anyone in my area has an accent, because of this reason. So, I’m having to think real hard about this, as I can’t make any distinctions, as I start off so bland that it really doesn’t matter. I think maybe all the time watching YouTube may have adjusted my idiolect. Maybe. Because I watch so many people with such different dialects and accents, so many people that I like, that it could influence my voice through trying to be more like them to make my channel better. Maybe also that I have a fondness of languages, that may have shaped something in my idiolect, because I start to pick up things from the languages I speak, like word order and other things like vowel shapes and stuff and may try to put it in my own speech. I don’t really know what might shape me, as I can’t tell. Most of my family either aren’t with me enough to affect me and/or are naturally bland like me. I don’t really have an idiolect, as it’s so bland it’s not really anything.
    Richard Howson

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  7. I think my idiolect changes depending on what mood I'm in. If I'm in a good mood I tend to talk a lot quicker and with a lot more slang words. Sometimes I don't even make any sense. If I'm in a bad mood I think i make more sense. I talk a lot slower and calmer. I also use bigger words and not much slang. I think I developed my Idiolect by hearing and reading things as I have grown up. Such as hearing your mum and dad talk, listening to the radio, reading things out of books e.t.c. I think I think I talk rather relaxed/lazy as I live a sort of relaxed sort of of life. Overall I think how someone is feeling heavily effects there idiolect as well as what they have taken in when they have grown up - James Mason

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  8. I think that a persons idiolect is heavily influenced by their parent's idiolect. You grow up listening to how your parents talk, picking up certain phrases and words that are commonly used within your parents language- so you therefore use those words yourself- whether you notice it or not. Also, your culture and surroundings influence how you speak. For me personally, growing up in Bicester has given me more of the Oxfordshire accent. Yet if I had grown up where I was born, I would speak completely differently- I would probably use words that I would use now, but I may give them different meanings, and pronounce them completely differently. It is like in America, they use the English language, but have adapted it to their own culture. Americans pronounce the word 'garage' as 'ga-rajh' whereas most British people pronounce it 'gar-idge'. My idiolect also depends on who I'm with. With some of my friends I may use certain words that don't necessarily make sense to other people. So if I said that word in a sentence to someone else, they might not understand the meaning of it, or why I had said it, as my friends and I would. - Lauren Page

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  9. A great many things form a person’s own idiolect- places you visit; family; media and friends. I know I talk with a typical Oxfordshire accent because this is where I live now and most of the people I know are from this area. However, whenever I go back home to Wiltshire I seem to become a Farmer again. Whenever I’m back there I slip into slightly rolling r’s again. Idiots become ‘gurtwazzocks’; people who are left handed are cack-handed; run turns into ‘peg-it’ and a seagull is referred to as an ehawk. We combine words, too (here it is: yertiz). A lot of this comes from the way my Grandparents spoke who were those stereotypical elderly patriots sticking to their guns and striving on their own to turn the nation into their kind of people. The way I actually pronounce words is also influenced by my reading a lot. I read something, see a word, it sticks in my mind and leads me to saying it literally how it’s spelt. I still have to think carefully before saying gesture. The way you speak really depends where you are and who you are talking to- you have different ways to suit the different people you know.

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  10. I have a very typical Oxfordshire accent. I think this is due to the way my family down south speaks as they are all from Oxfordshire and have always made a big point of correct pronunciation. My family up north however have very strong Yorkshire accents and I notice when I stay with them, initially my Oxfordshire accent becomes more noticeable before I start to talk more like them, picking up mam instead of mum. I like finding new words and using them where possible, I think my reading so much has influence my interests in this and the way in which I describe things as well.

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  11. I think a persons idiolect is highly affected by their individual birth place, those first words that you will ever hear will stick with you although you won't ever know it. You spend the first year of your life just listening to not just your mothers voice but all those around you. The first four months of your life are the most precious to a parent and I think those vital first months affect the way you speak because you develop and learn the accent of your parents voice that you will always recognise. I was born right down south in the sunny seaside of Weymouth, from then on I developed that strong south accent, with the way you say things like bath, grass, last and so on. I also found that once I had spent time with very important family equal friends from up 't' 'north, I took on words and phrases that I had never heard of before, like that one. Things like the word 'drop' to us is completely miss used but to them and now me it's normal, and things like calling someone a madden, never heard of it until then and I now use that within my normal vocabulary. When I spend time with my northern friends they always tell me how posh I sound because I live in 'oxford' because of the pronunciation of certain words that I have already mentioned, it causes you to pick up on things.

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  12. I think my idiolect is mostly influenced by my family. My grandparents are from the Caribbean, and naturally, my mum and dad picked up some of the slang and catchphrases used in the West Indies, which ultimately formed my idiolect. Sometimes there are certain West Indie catchphrases or words I use that I have adapted to the way my friends speak, and have moulded to fit my Bicester accent. I think my friends have influenced the way I speak also, because they have different slang and catchphrases that have been taught by their parents, which I pick up on to. People from the West Indie islands tend to accent their speech a lot with animated small sounds such as "tch" or "eh" and link up words with "ah's" which may be the reason why some of my friends think the way I talk is funny, as I have been exposed to different Caribbean accents all my life. I also used to spend a lot of time in Oxford, and the Oxford accent is also slightly different to a Bicester accent, with words pronounced much sharper. Sometimes I find my idiolect slipping into different accents and phrases which it makes it hard for some people around me to keep up with, but my accent changes depending who I'm with and how well I know them.

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  13. Your idiolect is mostly influenced by your parents because they are the first people your are with and also the people you are mostly with when you are learning to speak. You pick up how they pronounce words and certain phrases they say because as you are growing up that is what seems correct to you. Also the ways the rest of your family say words and some phrases can then be passed on to your parents and yourself. Most of my family have lived in Oxfordshire for a while so they all have a similar accent which mean I have quite a strong, clean one two. How I pronounce words are also changed due to being lazy in some pronouncing which is becoming more common in society. For example, not pronouncing t's or h's. Also due to the social class I belong to, it is not essential for me to perfect my pronunciation. Habits have led to some different pronunciation.

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  14. I do not think that my idiolect is very exciting. I have lived in Bicester since before I could talk so the way I speak seems very bland because most of the people around me sound the same. Most of my family are from the south so I don't really notice too large a difference, however, there are some differences. For example, when I visit my family in Basingstoke, I notice that their speech is a little more lazy, miss pronouncing t's and h's. - George Muddle

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  15. I think that the environments I have lived in have influenced my idiolect. As I was brought up outside of Oxfordshire I have picked up different words to be pronounced differently but now that I have been living in Bicester for some time now I think that I do speak differently to how I used to. I also think that my idiolect is strongly influenced by what I have picked up from my parents and the people I talk to.
    Shaun Kailla.

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  16. I think my idiolect is influenced by the places I've lived and the people I've been around. My default idiolect is from where I was born (Nottinghamshire) and I still use phrases and have the accent from living there. When I'm at school etc my accent is much more like the Oxfordshire accent but when I'm more relaxed, like when I'm with family, my northern accent is much stronger and more noticeable. I try not to talk in a strong northern accent around people from Oxfordshire because it sticks out and sounds a bit weird. I think someones idiolect is based mainly on the idiolect that they hear the most, but also it depends on the situation they are in. Just because someone has a set accent/preferred accent doesn't mean that they can't or don't change it so that they don't stick out from other people around them.
    -Ellie

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  17. The main influences for my idiolect most probably came from my parents because they taught me how to talk. Due to this I sometimes speak similarly to them and occasionally use the same phrases as them. I also generally try to copy the way whoever I am talking to talks, so this I imagine also influences my idiolect.

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  18. A main thing that I find affects my idiolect is the area I'm from. I have created and adapted my accent and words due to the way everyone around me speaks. Not only do I pick things up from family and people from my surrounding area but also my friends. When I'm around friends and people from different places I pick up on the phrases and words they use which affects the way I speak when I'm around other people. Also I final thing that affects my idiolect is social media: online I pick up on phrase and abbreviations said which then affects the words I use and the way I have conversations with people in person.

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